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ASTHO President's Challenge Initiatives

A yearly initiative of ASTHO to improve population health through the work of state public health agencies.

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  • Despite Some Prevention Successes, Antimicrobial Resistance Remains a Global Challenge

    For the past 80 years, antibiotics have allowed doctors to treat bacterial infections and control infectious disease outbreaks that would previously have become wide-scale epidemics. However, much of this progress could be undermined by the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance. Although some antibiotic resistance is a natural result of normal antibiotic use, widespread antibiotic use—often for inappropriate reasons—has escalated this process. Nov. 18-24 is U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week, an annual observance to increase awareness of antibiotic resistance.

  • Every State Puts Forward Legislation Addressing Prescription Drug Affordability

    High-cost prescription drugs have a clear budgetary impact for public and commercial payers and consumers alike. Prescription drug costs represent approximately 9.8 percent of total healthcare expenditures, and accounted for $333.4 billion spent on prescription drugs in 2017 (compared to $236 billion only a decade prior). In addition, Medicaid spending on outpatient drugs increased by 21 percent between 2014 and 2015, from $45.9 million to $55.6 million, and by a further 11 percent to $61.9 million in 2016 and is expected to continue growing.

  • States Maintain and Increase Vaccine Coverage Through Legislative Action

    Increasing and maintaining vaccine coverage is an important way to prevent the spread of disease and keep communities healthy. Vaccines have greatly reduced or eliminated many infectious diseases that once killed or harmed infants, children, and adults. Not only can vaccines prevent certain diseases in vaccinated individuals, they can also lower the chance of spreading disease to vulnerable populations such as infants, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems who are especially vulnerable to infectious diseases and may not be able to be vaccinated. Each year, thousands of adults in the U.S. become seriously ill and are hospitalized because of diseases that vaccines help prevent.