Infectious Disease

Healthcare-Associated Infections

As a significant cause of death, healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are a critical challenge to public health in the United States. At any given time, about 1 in 25 patients has an infection while receiving care in U.S. hospitals. These infections result in up to $33 billion in excess medical costs every year.

ASTHO is working with HHS, CDC, and the Keystone Center to determine the role of state health officials in decreasing and preventing HAIs, specifically addressing priorities, challenges, and solutions at the state and regional level. In March 2011, ASTHO and CDC jointly released the HAI policy toolkit -Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections: State Policy Options. The companion report, Policies for Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections: Lessons from State Stakeholder Engagement was released in January 2012. ASTHO also maintains situational awareness on HAI-related policies and initiatives, shares this information with members, and represents the state health agency perspective.

ASTHO Resources

Policy Backgrounder: HAI Prevention and Policy Implementation

Toolkit: Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections: State Policy Options

Companion Report: Policies for Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections: Lessons from State Stakeholder Engagement

  • We value your opinion! Provide feedback on the above toolkit and report.

CDC Public Health Practice Story from the Field: Educating Policymakers about Strategies for Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections, an initiative of ASTHO

Poster: Effective State Policy Interventions for the Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections
Presented at the 2011 CSTE Annual Conference

Issue Brief: State Strategies to Address Antimicrobial Resistance
Results of a survey of HAI coordinators to better understand states' and territories' work on and different approaches to antibiotic resistance and stewardship

Information Scan: Regional Prevention Efforts for Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae
Presents strategies, illustrated by findings, examples, and tips from discussions with five states and a nationwide survey, to help states position coordinated regional CRE prevention efforts.

ASTHO Supports the “One and Only Campaign” for Safe Injection Practices

One Needle, One Syringe, Only One Time. Safe Injection Practices Coalition ASTHO is a member of the Safe Injection Practices Coalition (SIPC), a partnership to promote safe injection practices in all U.S. healthcare settings. In the last decade, at least 150,000 patients were potentially exposed to hepatitis and HIV due to unsafe injection practices. SIPC has developed the One & Only Campaign, a public health education and awareness campaign with a number of free resources including posters, brochures, a continuing education course, an educational video, and a series of toolkits.

HAI Legislative Tracking

HAI Legislative Tracking
Real-time state legislative tracking on select issues is available on our website. HAI legislation is available under the Infectious Disease profile.

HAI Legislative Summary 2014
This chart lists state legislation introduced in the 2014 session. Three states passed HAI legislation. Two bills modified existing HAI reporting requirements (CT and NH). MN's bill addressed nonpayment for hospital-acquired conditions. (Updated December 23, 2014.)                                     

HAI Legislative Summary 2013
This chart lists state legislation introduced in the 2013 session. Three states passed HAI legislation regarding reporting requirements: ME, TX, and WA. (Updated December 19, 2013.)

HAI Legislative Summary 2012
This chart lists state legislation introduced in the 2012 session. Two states passed HAI legislation, NH (HAI reporting requirements and fees) and UT (HAI data sharing). (Updated August 2, 2012.)

HAI Legislative Summary 2011
Five states passed HAI legislation, four bills (AR, HI, ME, NC) dealing with reporting information to NHSN and making that data available to the health department, and one (NV) requiring facilities to provide infection information to patients. HI and NC added requirements for public reporting; ME states public reporting rule to be adopted by the Health Data Organization; AR had previous public reporting language. (Updated August 11, 2011.)